Tuesday October 22nd 2019

New topic on emotional health provides strategies for nurses

The five new articles in the January 2015 OJIN topic, Emotional Health: Strategies for Nurses, discuss a variety of aspects related to psychiatric and mental health concerns.

The 2014 Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice is the specialty’s description of competent nursing practice. The topic begins with “The 2014 Scope and Standards of Practice for Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing: Key Updates” by Catherine F. Kane, PhD, RN, FAAN. This article offers a brief overview of the revision process, describes key factors that influenced the revision, such as external documents and current priorities in health care, and synthesizes significant changes to the document, including commentary and comparisons to the generalist Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice.

Nurses have the greatest opportunity to identify and intervene with suicidal patients. Unfortunately, most RNs have little or no training to assess, evaluate, treat or refer a suicidal patient. Many RNs feel ill-prepared and afraid to talk to patients about suicide. In “Suicide Assessment and Nurses: What Does the Evidence Show?” authors Carrie Holliday, PhD, ARNP; Cindy Bolster, MN, ARNP; Gail Oneal, PhD, RN; and Michelle Shaw, PhD, RN, review the state of the science of suicide assessment training for nurses. Research suggests that once RNs are trained in suicide assessment, they are able to help those with suicidal tendencies.

Four of 10 inmates released from prison recidivate and are re-incarcerated within three years. Mental illness is disproportionately represented in prisons, where half of incarcerated individuals have mental illness, compared with 11 percent of the population. Author Samantha Hoke, MSN, RN, PMHNP-BC, in the article “Mental Illness and Prisoners: Concerns for Communities and Healthcare Providers” provides a brief overview of health care in the corrections environment and discusses factors that affect mental health care in prisons, such as characteristics of the prison population and social policy.

As a result of more than 13 years of war and military combat operations, the number of veterans, military families and service members with mental health needs continues to increase across civilian and federal health care services. Invisible wounds of war associated with brain injury and traumatic stress increase clinical care challenges into the foreseeable future. In the article “Military Culture Implications for Mental Health and Nursing Care,” authors Richard J. Westphal, PhD, PMHCNS-BC, APRN, and Sean P. Convoy, DNP, PMHNP-BC, describe two interrelated concepts of military cultural competence and stress injuries.

More than 5 million people in the United States are diagnosed with some form of dementia, and many more with cognitive impairment remain undiagnosed. The vast majority are cared for in home and community-based settings by unpaid caregivers, often family members, who struggle with daily challenges. In “Using Cultural Competence to Promote Mental Health in Patients with Dementia,” authors Bindiya Jha, MA; Julie Seavy, RN, MTS; David Young, PhD; and Alice Bonner, PhD, RN, FAAN, describe the use of structured family caregiving to provide culturally competent care and promote positive mental health in patients facing changes from dementia. The article reviews a case study of a Bhutanese family and describes effective strategies for nurses to consider.

Read these articles at www.nursingworld.org/OJIN.

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